OH Agenda

 Register Agenda Speakers 

 

PRECONFERENCE COURSES
SUNDAY JUNE 10, 2018
8:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Accessing Public Health Resources for Occupational Health
Julie Fischer, PhD, Co-Director, Center for Global Health Science and Security , Georgetown University Medical School
Federal, State, and local public health organizations share responsibility for efforts to protect workers and the community from exposures to pathogens that threaten the public’s health. Resources developed to prevent, detect, and respond to public health threats, including globally emerging infectious diseases, may be useful in the management of biological risks in the research laboratory or clinical setting. This course will provide an overview of public health resources available for biosafety and occupational health programs, and will use a case study-based approach to highlight mechanisms for and issues in accessing these resources.

1:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Occupational Health Issues For Work in Biological Laboratories and Vivariums
Gary Fujimoto, MD, Physician/Occupational Medicine Consultant;
Maureen Thompson, RN, COHN-S, RBP, Environmental Health and Safety, Emory University

This introduction or refresher course provides an overview of medical surveillance and monitoring issues for those working with animals and for those in biological laboratories. This will include issues surrounding biological hazards, zoonotic diseases, select agents, work with non-human primates and anesthetic gases, humanized animals along with updates on bloodborne pathogens.
COLLOQUIUM
MONDAY, JUNE 11, 2018
 
Morning Session

8:30 am Welcome

 

Session A: Prion-like Proteins


8:45 am Presentation/Discussion: Evaluating Risk, Handling, and Disinfection

Susan Vleck, PhD, RPB, Environmental Health & Safety, Stanford University

One pathological characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s is the accumulation and aggregation of misfolded proteins. Recent studies of these proteins has given rise to a growing body of evidence that these proteins may misfold and propagate in a prion-like mechanism, one that is capable of cell-to-cell transmission of the resulting proteinopathy. There is currently no known treatment for prion diseases, and the treatment of many neurodegenerative disorders is aimed at alleviating symptoms. Additionaly, prions are some of the most difficult pathogenic agents to decontaminate, and evidence is beginning to suggest that these neurodegenerative-associated proteins are similarly resistant to many methods of decontamination. This session will provide a brief background of these issues and discuss the risk assessment implications for the handling and disinfection of these proteins.

 

9:45 Break

 

Session B: Toxins

 

10:00 am Presentation/Discussion: Challenges when Toxins are used as Research Tools

Stacey Kraemer, PhD, Biosafety, UCLA

Although most researchers view toxins as chemicals, oversight of toxins often fall into a safety gap between biological and chemical safety offices, providing challenges in communicating expectations for safety and occupational health planning and response at many institutions.  After a brief introduction of microbial and nonmicrobial toxins, Dr. Kraemer will present case studies from her experiences in academic institutions that demonstrate the complex questions arising from their use. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss the challenges they face at their facilities, along with potential solutions.

 

11:00am Case Studies: CFA  (Complete Freund’s Adjuvant) Case Studies

Gary Fujimoto, MD, Physician/Occupational Medicine Consultant;
Maureen Thompson, RN, COHN-S, RBP, Environmental Health and Safety, Emory University

 

12:00 Lunch

 

Afternoon Session

Session C:  Gene Therapy

 

1:00 pm Presentation: Gene Therapy: The Big Picture

Daniel Kavanagh, PhD, Senior Scientific Advisor, Gene Therapy

The pace of effective medical treatments for genetic disorders and cancers has been rapidly increasing due to several successes in gene therapy research and applications. What are these successes? What will be happening in the future? What are the biosafety implications?

 

2:00 Break

 

2:15 pm Presentation: Lentiviral and Retroviral Vector Update

Gary Fujimoto, MD, Physician/Occupational Medicine Consultant

 

3:30 pm Break


3:45 pm Discussion:
Post Exposure Prophylaxis for Retroviral Vectors

Gary Fujimoto, MD, Physician/Occupational Medicine Consultant;
Warner Hudson, MD, FACOEM FAAFP, Medical Director, UCLA Medical Center

Retroviral and lentiviral vectors are being utilized in an increasing number of ways as gene transfer becomes a mainstream technique in modern medicine.  This presentation will discuss the updates on these technologies including CRISPR and RNA interference along with the risks and treatment options following laboratory exposures.

5:00 pm Conclusion

 
 
TUESDAY JUNE 12, 2018
Morning Session

Session D:  Veterinary Infectious Diseases

 

8:30 am Presentation: Humanized Mice: Science and Safety

Scott Kitchen, PhD, Director, UCLA CFAR/JCCC Humanized Mouse Core Laboratory;
Warner Hudson, MD, FACOEM FAAFP, Medical Director, UCLA Medical Center;
Stacey Kraemer, PhD, Biosafety, UCLA

  1. The science – what is a humanized mouse, how do you create one, why is it useful in research, what are some of the current research projects that use humanized mice?
  2. What are the occupational health challenges when creating them and working with them for vivarium staff, researchers, and contractors?
  3. What information needs to be brought to the IBC and IACUC related to biosafety and occupational health?

 

10:30 am Break

 

10:45 am Presentation: “Bad Bugs from the Barnyard to your Bench”

Roger Belcourt, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Medical Director of Occupational Health, UC Davis

This lecture will explore the agents responsible for Q fever and Brucellosis. The implementation of a Q fever surveillance program at UC Davis is described.

 

12:15 Lunch

Afternoon Session

1:15 pm Session E:  Tools for Biosafety

UCLA Spreadsheet

Stacey Kraemer, PhD, Biosafety, UCLA

The expectations for preventative measures and surveillance provisions appropriate with broad-scope research enterprises can be a challenge to communicate to both researchers, support staff and occupational health providers.  These may include measures appropriate to address exposures to animals, biohazards and physical hazards in various research settings, including those associated with human subject- and international research programs.  In an attempt to provide alignment among these diverse groups, UCLA’s Occupational Health and Safety Coordinating Council collaborated to develop a reference tool, which will be presented.  Participants will have the opportunity to discuss the UCLA tool, additional or alternative communication solutions that have utilized at their institutions to facilitate collaborative communication of Occupational Health expectations. 

 

2:15 pm Session G:  Travel Medicine

Includes protecting people working in field, people traveling to work in research laboratories, AND people traveling to respond to natural disasters. 

Warner Hudson, MD, FACOEM FAAFP, Medical Director, UCLA Medical Center;
Julie Fischer, PhD, Co-Director, Center for Global Health Science and Security , Georgetown University Medical School

3:45 pm Q&A

4:00 Conclusion

Speakers
Roger Belcourt, MD, MPH, FACOEM, Medical Director of Occupational Health, UC Davis;
Julie Fischer, PhD, Co-Director, Center for Global Health Science and Security , Georgetown University Medical School;
Gary Fujimoto, MD, Physician/Occupational Medicine Consultant;
Warner Hudson, MD, FACOEM FAAFP, Medical Director, UCLA Medical Center;
Daniel Kavanagh, PhD, Senior Scientific Advisor, Gene Therapy; WIRB-Copernicus Group;
Scott Kitchen, PhD, Director, UCLA CFAR/JCCC Humanized Mouse Core Laboratory;
Stacey Kraemer, PhD, Biosafety, UCLA;
Maureen Thompson, RN, COHN-S, RBP, Environmental Health and Safety, Emory University;
Susan Vleck, PhD, Environmental Health and Safety, Stanford University;